Search This Blog

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Editors -- An End Has a Start

Photobucket
8/10

What the heck, let's ramble. And let's make it one paragraph. My first year of marriage was like a film. Some people say that Kirk Cameron firefighting marriage movie is cheesy and unrealistic. I disagree because I pretty much lived it, except I worked at the library and helped people log on to the computer and find books about kittens instead of rescuing children from burning buildings. Once my wife and I hit somewhere around our seventh or eighth month of marriage, I suddenly started to feel this quiet ecstasy in my heart that after everything my wife and I had been through, we were going to make it. When you are young, you generally think the whole Earth is a stage set just for you, and I certainly did. Editors' An End Has a Start hits that perfect, over-dramatic sweet-spot that reflected my state of mind at the time. It's a huge sounding album about life and death and all that kind of stuff. I can't really listen to it without remembering that time, and feeling a gratitude that those optimistic feelings paid off. Looking objectively at this album, it's slightly top-loaded, but not as badly as its predecessor. It doesn't lose momentum like The Back Room did, and is a step up from that album's post-punk sound, adding huge, monolithic slabs of guitar (once again indebted to Echo and the Bunnymen) to its mix. Frontman, Tom Smith, isn't really interested in any small things on this album. "We've all been changed from what we were, our broken hearts smashed on the floor." Man, that's growing up right there. Hey, you know who else had their hearts broken a couple of times in 2007? The LSU Tigers football team. They lost two heart-breakers that season in triple-overtime. But did they give up? No. My wife hates football, but I wish there was a way I could explain to her how much that football team taught me a "don't give up, ever" attitude that kept me strong in our marriage that year. Of course, both people have to end up having that attitude. If one person isn't giving up, and the other person doesn't care, then eventually, it's over. If Les Miles didn't have faith in his players, he wouldn't have let them go for it on fourth down five times. But they all had faith in each other, and EVERYONE worked for it. That was definitely an instance of sports being inspirational, at least for me. This is what I'm talking about.

At the start of the new year, LSU was holding a National Championship trophy, and my wife and I were beginning our second, incredibly-better-than-the-first year of marriage. And I felt like a man, having gone through the hard truths and heartaches of life, but coming out stronger. In several ways, An End Has a Start is all about that. My wife and I fully lived the hyper-dramatic lyrics of track three, "The Weight of the World." "You touch my face, God whispers in my ears, there are tears in my eyes, love replaces fear." Those might be over the top, but when you are 25, face failure that seems insurmountable, miraculously climb over it, they are pretty apt. Then again, in reverse of my high school attitudes, everything doesn't apply to everything. Anyway, I like this album, but I am probably biased.


2007 Kitchenware/Fader Label
1. Smokers Outside the Hospital Doors 4:57
2. An End Has a Start 3:45
3. The Weight of the World 4:18
4. Bones 4:06
5. When Anger Shows 5:45
6. The Racing Rats 4:17
7. Push Your Head Towards the Air 5:44
8. Escape the Nest 4:43
9. Spiders 4:00
10. Well Worn Hand 2:54

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Oceana Change Name to Polyenso, Are Awesome


I can't get enough of this stuff. It's time to bring the saxophone back. Glad I contributed to the Kickstarter. There's more info on this website I'm glad I don't have to have an account on to read information.

Editors -- The Back Room

Photobucket
7/10

Editors' debut album, The Back Room, kicks off with "Lights," an incredible song, pulsing with dark, dynamic, post-punk energy. "Lights" owes in no small part to the band I just finished reviewing over the past two weeks. The second track, "Munich" might even be better, more urgent, yet tempering it's bleakness with a laconically humorous attitude. It seems that we are in for a debut for the ages. Sadly, this is not the case.
The returns and the sense of urgency diminish quickly, and the tone gets blurry. The following nine tracks are pretty solid, but nowhere near fulfill the promise of the first two. What's worse, there's a certain drowsiness that kicks in around the midpoint, that feeling of falling asleep to an album and awaking five songs later, disoriented. I can't really describe it in less abstract terms, but I've never been able to shake it when I listen to The Back Room.
Still, on the basis of the utmost quality of the first two tracks and the solid if samey virtues of the rest, Editors establish themselves as a band to watch.


2005 Kitchenware/Fader Label
1. Lights 2:31
2. Munich 3:46
3. Blood 3:29
4. Fall 5:06
5. All Sparks 3:33
6. Camera 5:02
7. Fingers in the Factories 4:14
8. Bullets 3:09
9. Someone Says 3:13
10. Open Your Arms 6:00
11. Distance 3:38

Monday, October 29, 2012

Echo and the Bunnymen -- Siberia

Photobucket
8/10

Now this is what you want your band to sound like when your members are coming up on fifty. Enlisting Hugh Jones, the producer of Heaven Up Here, arguably the Bunnymen's finest album, Echo and the Bunnymen release, Siberia, their most rocking album in more than twenty years. Finally those four classic early 80's albums receive their worthy successor. Sure, it isn't as gritty as those albums, but the instruments are turned up, Ian McCulloch finally goes back to more than just crooning, and all bets are off. Even when the band aren't rocking hard, Jones has the wisdom to turn up the knob. For the first time since their early work, the Bunnymen sound like they are in your face instead of just lounging around in the next room. On top of that, the songwriting is stronger than it's been in years. Best of all, the Bunnymen finally tackle a song nearly as aggressive as Heaven Up Here's "Over the Wall." That song is "Scissors in the Sand," and it's the best track the band have put to tape since Reagan left office.

Will Sergeant receives special praise here, as his guitar gets the workout it's so long deserved. The hired backing band do an admirable job rocking as well.
Siberia isn't an all out audio assault, however. The reflective side of the band that's taken over as of late is tempered by Jones into true grit instead of schmaltz. Album closer, "What If We Are?" might have gotten the syrupy vibraphone and strings treatment of some of Echo's more recent ballads, but Jones brings McCulloch's cigarette strained voice to the absolute fore. Dropping out all other instruments for the final twenty seconds, Hugh ensures that McCulloch's final, aging pleas get the resonance they deserve.
And thus ends the storied career of one of the best bands in history. Just kidding, they released the completely inconsequential, The Fountain, four years later, but lets just act like that didn't happen.
What U2 Were Doing At the Time: U2 were coming off the huge financial success of their eleventh album, How To Dismantle An Atomic Bomb, though Bono later admitted that artistically, the album didn't achieve the goals or standards that the band set out with. That's not something Ian McCulloch or Will Sergeant had to cop to after Siberia, which exceeded all expectations.

2005 Cooking Vinyl
1. Stormy Weather 4:24
2. All Because of You Days 5:44
3. Parthenon Drive 5:11
4. In the Margins 5:06
5. Of a Life 3:44
6. Make Us Blind 4:00
7. Everything Kills You 4:17
8. Siberia 4:56
9. Sideways Eight 3:16
10. Scissors in the Sand 5:29
11. What If We Are? 5:09

Friday, October 26, 2012

Echo and the Bunnymen -- Flowers

Photobucket
7/10

I said Echo and the Bunnymen's What Are You Going to Do With Your Life? was the sound of frontman, Ian McCulloch, watching his sun set and waiting for the stars to come out. On its follow up, Flowers, the stars have come out, but McCulloch has wandered into the woods.
Flowers is a weird, mellow, trippy album for most of its run. That sound works for McCulloch and fellow original member, guitarist, Will Sergeant. They are obviously far chilled out from their crazy post-punk days, but realize weirdness has always been one of their charming strongsuits. The relaxed, but slightly dark acid trip of the first seven tracks works well, even when some poppy hooks nod their way in. Unfortunately, the more lucid, old-dude rock of the final four tracks re-rails the delightful derailment of those first seven songs and just makes Echo and the Bunnymen sound ordinary. It's a shame. I rather the whole album sound like this:

Then again, seven out of eleven ain't band. I guess I can round down that second number.
What U2 Were Doing At the Time: A few months before Flowers was released, U2 released their "comeback" album, All That You Can't Leave Behind. Perhaps taking a page from Echo and the Bunnymen's now nearly two-year old What Are You Going to Do With Your Life?, U2 embraced their aging rock star identity with admirable results. However, U2 had already taken over the world, and was basically just sitting by the stage. All they had to do was hop back on it. By the turn of the century, Echo and the Bunnymen were now nothing but a cult phenomenon, albeit one I enjoyed and still enjoy highly. One review to go.

2001 Cooking Vinyl
1. King of Kings 4:24
2. SuperMellow Man 4:58
3. Hide & Seek 4:07
4. Make Me Shine 3:54
5. It's Alright 3:32
6. Buried Alive3:55
7. Flowers 4:16
8. Everybody Knows 4:40
9. Life Goes On 3:59
10. An Eternity Turns 4:03
11. Burn for Me 3:41

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Echo and the Bunnymen -- What Are You Going to Do with Your Life?

Photobucket
9/10

1999, the year before I graduated high school, was the best of my life to this moment. I remember sitting in my car that summer on my Winn-Dixie lunch break, trying to plot out a time to go see American Beauty (a manipulative, but incredibly well-made film), when this song came on my KLSU-tuned radio.

My first thought was, wow this song is beautiful. My second thought was, who is this wise old dude singing it? That old dude was Ian McCulloch, and while What Are You Going to Do With Your Life? is an Echo and the Bunnymen album, and the first my 17-year old self ever heard of the band, it might as well be an Ian McCulloch solo album. As it turns out, though, in the case of What Are You Going to Do With Your Life?, that is a very good thing.
What Are You Going to Do With Your Life? is the sound of Ian McCulloch watching his own sun set, and waiting for the stars to come out. He fully embraces his aging rock-star identity, doesn't try to be something he is not, and produces a chilled out album of mostly full-band and strings acoustic songs punctuated by electric lights from guitarist, Will Segeant, the Bunnymen's only other remaining original member.
The cover art of McCulloch gradually wandering into a desert makes for a great reflection of the album, as well. A few weeks after hearing this for the first time, my family took a trip all the way across America on I-10 West to the Pacific. I saw the American West for the first time with this album fresh in my head, facing one more year of high school and wondering the very question of the album title. The answer was simple: Review this album on my Internet blog thirteen years later and give it a 9/10.
What U2 Were Doing At the Time: While Echo and the Bunnymen had now learned the art of aging gracefully, U2 was still two years away from doing the same (with 2001's excellent All That You Can't Leave Behind). In fact, U2 was fresh off of kind of embarrassing themselves by doing exactly the opposite with the promotion of their 1997 Pop album, trying to be hip and with it like the kids these days, and just looking kind of silly. Actually, with the rumors of who has been producing them lately, I'm scared they're about to do it again, but anyway... Between U2 and Echo and the Bunnymen, the Bunnymen always peaked first, and their "check it out, we're old" album is no different.

1999 London Records
1. What Are You Going to Do with Your Life? 5:11
2. Rust 5:09
3. Get in the Car 4:21
4. Baby Rain 4:17
5. History Chimes 3:25
6. Lost on You 4:50
7. Morning Sun 4:12
8. When It All Blows Over 2:57
9. Fools Like Us 4:02

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Echo and the Bunnymen -- Evergreen

Photobucket
6/10

The first five or six times I listened to Echo and the Bunnymen's Evergreen, I thought after the first few songs, this is pretty good. Then I'd start to notice something. You know how when someone massages your shoulders, it feels good at first? Actually, that is a terrible analogy for me to give. I hate when people touch me. I'll stick with it, though. You know how when someone massages your shoulders, it feels good at first? But what if that person just keeps massaging the same exact spot over and over again? At first, it feels abrasive...then your shoulder gets numb. That's exactly what listening to Evergreen is like. It feels good to listen to in pieces, a kind of pre-cursor to early Coldplay (Four years later, Ian McCulloch was hanging out with that band in the studio while they recorded A Rush of Blood to the Head). It is way laid back but doesn't commit to being laid back with enough conviction to fully work that way. There are some choruses and moments that rock, but the album doesn't commit to that either. Instead, it panders to something close to adult contemporary the same way their self-titled album pandered to 80's pop-rock. Thus, it has its moments for sure, and isn't a bad album, but it isn't really anything else.

What U2 Were Doing At the Time: Echo and the Bunnymen broke up after the Noel Burke-led Reverberation, partially re-formed as a new band in Electrafixion, and finally rejoined (minus the deceased Pete de Freitas on drums) for the disappointing Evergreen. During this eight year period, U2 released the career defining re-invention, Achtung Baby, the difficult but worthy, Zooropa, and the almost as disappointing as Evergreen, Pop.

1997 London Records
1. Don't Let It Get You Down 3:52
2. In My Time 3:26
3. I Want to Be There (When You Come) 3:39
4. Evergreen 4:11
5. I'll Fly Tonight 4:24
6. Nothing Lasts Forever 3:57
7. Baseball Bill 4:04
8. Altamont 3:53
9. Just a Touch Away 5:09
10. Empire State Halo 4:00
11. Too Young to Kneel 3:40
12. Forgiven 5:49

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Echo and the Bunnymen -- Reverberation

Photobucket
7/10

Their drummer deceased, and their vocalist gone solo, Bunnymen guitarist, Will Sergeant, and bassist, Les Pattinson, were on their own. Bravely, they decided to forge ahead. Picking up Noel Burke on the microphone, Damon Reece on the drums, and a cadre of Indian instrumentalists, Echo and the Bunnymen released 1990's Reverberation. With all the trippy instruments, Beatles' fabled engineer, Geoff Emerick, producing, and Will Sergeant leading the show with his guitar as if he is the Hookah-Smoking Caterpillar from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Reverberation is possibly the most psychedelic album the Bunnymen ever recorded, and certainly the most British. The British part can also be attributed to Burke's thick-sounding vocals, which could have spawned from no other land.
Despite this one-time singer switch-up (original vocalist, Ian McCulloch, would be back for all following albums), Sergeant's guitar and Pattinson's bass-playing are unique enough to make this still sound like a Bunnymen release--today, one could possibly fool a newcomer by telling them McCulloch was actually the singer, and just had a cold during the recording.
Reverberation's songs are actually a little better on average than the ones found on the self-titled Bunnymen album that preceded it. These tracks are less bland on the whole, even though there are less standouts. The band's once razor edge may be nearly non-existent, but at least they sound like they care this time. In fact, the more one listens to Reverberation without the expectation of McCulloch's vocals, the better the album sounds.
It may have been a failure in its time, but in 2012, Reverberation isn't a bad way to spend 45-minutes. It's a mostly mellow trip, but one worth taking.

What U2 Were Doing At the Time: After finally suffering some measure of defeat with their sixth album, Rattle and Hum, U2's Bono announced that the band was going to "go away and...just dream it all up again." The Bunnymen were in the middle of doing the same thing, but unfortunately, it didn't work out as well, and they were soon to break up...for a little while.

1990 WEA Records
1. Gone, Gone, Gone 4:13
2. Enlighten Me 5:01
3. Cut & Dried 3:47
4. King of Your Castle 4:36
5. Devilment 4:44
6. Thick Skinned World 4:18
7. Freaks Dwell 3:51
8. Senseless 4:55
9. Flaming Red 5:33
10. False Goodbyes 5:40

Monday, October 22, 2012

Something Confusing About the Debate

How can you have a past versus future agenda
WHEN YOU'RE THE INCUMBENT?!?!

Photobucket

Echo and the Bunnymen -- Songs to Learn and Sing

Photobucket
8/10

(This was actually released before the previously reviewed album. I messed up. Sorry.)
Considering how well-crafted their albums are, one doesn't generally think of Echo and the Bunnymen as a "singles" band, but Songs to Learn and Sing proves they could be just that. Every single the band released from their inception to 1985 is included here in chronological order. While these songs come nowhere close to betraying the full scope of The Bunnymen's talents, their shining songwriting skills are on full display. There's at least one song from each of the band's first four albums, plus two early singles not found on their British debut. Their shining jewel in this crown, though, is "Bring On the Dancing Horses," orginally recorded for the Molly Ringwold-starring Pretty In Pink. It's what I like to call "timeless 80's," in that it's a comforting reminder of that decade's musical strengths, while not containing any of its tainting cheese. While "Bring On the Dancing Horses" is on Pretty In Pink's soundtrack, it's not actually in the film, and I am just going to go ahead and blame Jon Cryer, because 2.5 Men is a terrible show, and his house cost way more than a million dollars.

Sorry, Cryer.

1985 Korova Sire
1. Rescue 3:46
2. The Puppet 3:05
3. Do It Clean 2:43
4. A Promise 3:40
5. The Back of Love 3:13
6. The Cutter 3:55
7. Never Stop 3:29
8. The Killing Moon 5:46
9. Silver 3:17
10. Seven Seas 3:19
11. Bring On the Dancing Horses 3:56

Craig's Brother's First Two Albums Available On Vinyl for First Time Ever!

They are for sale at the link here in a variety of cool colors. This makes me hungry for some reason. Awesome that these two albums are getting the treatment they deserve, and these are sure to be collectors items when they inevitably sell out.
PhotobucketPhotobucket
Whoa, these two covers look cool when you combine them. I want some tacos now.

Friday, October 19, 2012

Echo and the Bunnymen -- Echo and the Bunnymen

Photobucket
7/10

After a few listens, I originally discounted Echo and the Bunnymen's self-titled album as a sellout record. However, before I went back to it for this review, I thought, "Well it is Echo and the Bunnymen selling out. Their talents should still shine through." Time to look at things with fresh eyes.
"The Game" is a good upbeat, but melancholy opener. I don't remember it being this good to be honest, but then again I am older and sadder than I used to be. "Over You" instantly reminds me of what originally ticked me off about this album. It reduces an incredibly unique rock band to your basic 80's pop-rock sound. I mean, it's not a bad song, and Ritz aren't bad crackers, but I'd rather eat a steak. "Bedbugs and Ballyhoo" is weird, and that is good. Despite the fact that it's over-polished, it's got a classic Echo guitar riff, bassline, and drumbeat, plus Ray Manzarek plays keyboards. "All in Your Mind" is decent, but hugs the 80's sound too tightly--the gated drums are particularly maddening when Echo's drums usually sound like thunder. "Bomber's Bay" is a well-regarded song, but it's kind of boring to me.
Next up is "Lips Like Sugar," probably the Bunnymen's biggest hit in America, and with good reason. It's a pretty sublime song, and it sounds better the more you hear it. Then again, it is really tough to see this very British band get Americanized.

"Lost and Found" isn't a song I've heard mentioned a lot, and that is a shame. It really is a buried gem, but after that, the following tracks are pleasant 80's wallpaper. That's really a shame. Echo and the Bunnymen used to knock down walls and smash foundations. They are not supposed to be the most boring part of the house. They are supposed to define the 80's, not take notes from it. Ahh, oh well. It is what it is. The band unofficially broke up a year later amid a many number of tensions. Then they got back together with a new singer, then they really broke up, then...I'll get to that. As it is, some of Echo and the Bunnymen is classic work, and some of it is boring, dated mush, not bad, but tragic considering the creativity this band was capable of.
What U2 Were Doing At the Time: "Then there was U2's album, (1987's) The Joshua Tree, and I remember thinking, "They're making records that are better than ours' and that really scared me."--Ian McCulloch, Echo and the Bunnymen frontman
"We should have been in America, playing every shitty place again, but I thought it would be crap, and in the Bunnymen, you couldn't be crap. I hated being away for three weeks; it was all cold silences. The atmosphere was hell. Some people have the ability to stick it out, like U2, but they're Irish. They've got that wandering Gypsy mentality. We could never have done it in a million years."--Will Sergeant, Echo and the Bunnymen guitarist
That about sums it up.
2003 Edition Bonus Tracks: "Jimmy Brown" is an earlier, rawer version of "Bring On the Dancing Horses" that features Ian McCulloch nearly screaming the chorus. "Hole in the Holy" is in a similar vein to the majority of Echo and the Bunnymen. "Soul Kitchen" is a fun Doors cover (though less famous than the "People Are Strange" one they did for Lost Boys). An acoustic cover of "The Game" captures its wistful sadness well. An early version of "Bedbugs and Ballyhoo" may actually work a little better than the album version simply because it isn't as meticulously put together. "Over Your Shoulder" is a distortion overdriven song that is so out of place with the rest of the songs on Echo and the Bunnymen it almost doesn't stand out. A nice extended version of "Bring On the Dancing Horses" closes out this period of original member Bunnymen records, and also ends Rhino's set of re-releases. That means the end of the bonus tracks section, too. Sob.

1987 WEA/Sire
1. The Game 3:50
2. Over You 4:01
3. Bedbugs and Ballyhoo 3:28
4. All in Your Mind 4:32
5. Bombers Bay 4:22
6. Lips Like Sugar 4:52
7. Lost and Found 3:37
8. New Direction 4:45
9. Blue Blue Ocean 5:08
10. Satellite 3:04
11. All My Life 4:07
2003 bonus tracks
12. Jimmy Brown (early version of "Bring On the Dancing Horses") 4:07
13. Hole in the Holy 4:44
14. Soul Kitchen 3:56
15. The Game (demo) 3:57
16. Bedbugs and Ballyhoo (early version) 3:41
17. Over Your Shoulder 4:10
18. Bring On the Dancing Horses (extended mix) 5:50

Thursday, October 18, 2012

Echo and the Bunnymen -- Ocean Rain

Photobucket
10/10

Echo and the Bunnymen's Ocean Rain is a delightful late night dance through a watery graveyard. If that doesn't make any sense, I'm sorry, but I can't think of any points of reference. This sounds exactly like my description, and no other album I've heard does. Ocean Rain is a completely unique work. The claustrophobia of Porcupine has been replaced with wonderful, haunting room to breathe. Ocean Rain is about as relaxed an album as possible, but still contains buckets of mystery and tension.

Also, it's fun. Plus, you've got Ian McCulloch wrestling with God, his band wildly succeeding in sounding gentler without losing an ounce of their edge, dynamic, swashbuckling strings, so natural it's like they're not even there, and enough water and ocean references to make you want to schedule a vacation for the next eclipse.
What U2 Were Doing At the Time: At the same time that Echo and the Bunnymen were releasing what might be their best work, U2 were doing the same, at least in my opinion. U2's Unforgettable Fire is the impressionistic sound of U2 finally letting go and freely falling into the artistic current. There is no agenda, no searching insecurity, just a moment in time captured impeccably. It's an absolutely gorgeous, emotional album. One day I might get to reviewing it. I've still got seventeen letters to go.
1984 was a great year for both of these bands. Even though I was barely peddling a tricycle, I'm glad to say I was around.
2003 Edition Bonus Tracks: A lot of bonus tracks here. The first is "Angels and Devils," an odd kind of throwback 60's rock song. This is aptly followed by a very pleasant, respectful live cover of the Beatles "All You Need Is Love." I also like how Ian McCulloch tosses his own past lyrics and those of other bands into the end of the song as a sly counterpoint to the Beatles doing the same in their original version. There are four other songs taken from this live session, two from the Bunnymen's debut album, and three from Ocean Rain. These are actually filtered through a 60's screen, as well, with the additional harpsichord, cello, bongos and woodwind backup the band had during the previous "All You Need Is Love" cover fully present. Strange that the first six bonus tracks sound fifteen years older than they are, but they are pretty magical recordings. The final two live tracks are Ocean Rain's "My Kingdom" and "Ocean Rain," taken from a more traditional theater show, and are announced by Ian McCulloch as coming from "The Greatest Album of All Time." He then proceeds to sing the songs like he means it. It's a great ending to this excellent collection of music.

1984 Korova
1. Silver 3:22
2. Nocturnal Me 4:57
3. Crystal Days 2:24
4. The Yo-Yo Man 3:10
5. Thorn of Crowns 4:52
6. The Killing Moon 5:50
7. Seven Seas 3:20
8. My Kingdom 4:05
9. Ocean Rain 5:12
2003 Edition Bonus Tracks
10. Angels and Devils 4:34
11. All You Need Is Love (Lennon–McCartney) (live) 6:44
12. The Killing Moon (live) 3:27
13. Stars are Stars (live) 3:07
14. Villiers Terrace (live) 6:00
15. Silver (live) 3:22
16. My Kingdom (live) 4:01
17. Ocean Rain" (live) – 5:18

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

I Prefer Heath Ledger

Photobucket

Echo & the Bunnymen -- Porcupine

Photobucket
8/10

A Porcupine is a pretty tough thing to get close to, and so is the Echo and the Bunnymen album of the same  name. After an enduringly prolific period, the Bunnymen suddenly found writing new material torturous, and indeed some of the songs on Porcupine sound like they were recorded in a torture chamber.

Of course, it's the coolest torture chamber ever devised. Though almost every second of Porcupine is full of noise, the material sounds as if it was crushed from the band. In all, though, the album isn't dark because of this, just difficult. On top of that, the strings produced by Indian artist, Shankar, ordered at the behest of the label to make the album more commercial, only add to Porcupine's thick prison of sound.
The first side is some of the best work the Bunnymen have ever recorded. Dual singles, "The Cutter" and "The Back of Love" contain rapturous outbursts of sound that could almost be mistaken for joy, but the melancholy undercurrents are clear enough. "My White Devil" is a sign of the coming second half of the album. "Clay" contains one of the Bunnymen's most desperate choruses, and a great sort of 80's timelessness. I've linked to "Porcupine" above, and it is emblematic of much of the album it is titled for. It starts off huge, looming boulders swinging overhead, then takes a completely unexpected turn 3:16 in, into a more conventional, straightforward song with some odd, Halloween-esque noises mixed in. That's pretty much how the album goes, as the next three tracks follow similar tempos and don't deviate much. They're good, but also kind of run in place until "Gods Will Be Gods" brings some hopeful urgency, and "In Bluer Skies" fulfills it's promise. Thus ends not the Bunnymen's best, but a Bunnymen album none the less.
What U2 Were Doing At the Time: While the Bunnymen were undergoing some writer's block, U2 were experiencing violent creativity. The very month that Porcupine was released, U2's militant War hit shelves, showcasing several new sides of the band, and thrusting them into the international spotlight. Of course, Ian McCulloch could still make fun of Bono's hair, and he did.
2003 Edition Bonus Tracks: "Fuel" is an oddly subdued but enjoyable Bunnymen song, even more weird due to the fact that it is led by a marimba and features no drums. After "Fuel" are five "Alternate Versions" of certain Porcupine tracks before the strings and final tinkerings were added. "The Cutter" is definitely less in its earlier form, though "My White Devil" sounds a little more urgent. "Porcupine"'s early form omits the surprise second half, and becomes simply a really cool passing movement. "Ripeness" benefits from its rowdier, rawer sound. "Gods Will Be Gods" is faster and more furious, possibly better than the album version. Overall, the alternate versions are a tossup. The Bunnymen's original cut of the album may have had a little more energy, but might not have necessarily been better. After the alternate takes is, "Never Stop (Discoteque)," an ill-advised trip down the lane of popular taste the Bunnymen didn't take often...then again, it isn't on the original LP, so I guess it doesn't really count. For what it's worth, the bridge is a nice callback to "Over the Wall."

1983 Korova/Sire/WEA
1. The Cutter 3:56
2. The Back of Love 3:14
3. My White Devil 4:41
4. Clay 4:15
5. Porcupine 6:01
6. Heads Will Roll 3:33
7. Ripeness 4:50
8. Higher Hell 5:01
9. Gods Will Be Gods 5:25
10. In Bluer Skies 4:33
2003 Edition Bonus Tracks
11. Fuel 4:09
12. The Cutter (Alternate Version) 4:10
13. My White Devil (Alternate Version) 5:02
14. Porcupine (Alternate Version) 4:04
15. Ripeness (Alternate Version) 4:43
16. Gods Will Be Gods (Alternate Version) 5:31
17. Never Stop (Discotheque) 4:45

Stone Cold E.T. Just Wants Some Cheeseburgers


Why did this make me cry? Is it really that funny? What's wrong with me?
Also, this whole exchange could have been avoided if the attendant would have gotten Stone Cold E.T.'s burgers.
Also, this is the best combination of 80's and 90's culture, ever.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Echo and the Bunnymen -- Heaven Up Here

Photobucket
10/10

Heaven Up Here is the coolest album ever made. The rhythm section have just arrived by train to kill you. The drummer pounds out an avalanche of tom-toms and snare falling around the noose of basslines that drag through the depths. A thirty-one year old album is not supposed to sound this good. Ian McCulloch's jangling rhythm guitar cuts through thin chords as Will Sergeant's lead sets off bombs in its wake. McCulloch howls and wails in the tempests, sings moodily through the quiet moments, and generally wreaks havoc. All manner of freaky echo and sound follow behind. By only their second album, Echo and the Bunnymen are at the top, and they know it.

What U2 Were Doing At the Time: U2's second album, October, was released just a few months after Heaven Up Here. October shows U2 looking for their identity in a way, not just musically, but spiritually, and as people. Bono's lyrics were stolen right before U2 had to record, and he was forced to rewrite them in a crunch. While U2 were searching and yearning, Echo and the Bunnymen were driving toward exactly what they wanted, even if it led them off a cliff. The focus helped. Heaven Up Here is a post-psychedelic masterpiece, while October is a lesser, but still enjoyable entry into U2's cannon.
2003 Edition Bonus Tracks: Though Heaven Up Here has the least amount of bonus tracks of the 2003 Editions, all five are extremely high quality. "Broke My Neck" is a long, skeletal, trippy number featuring one of the greatest recorded non-solo guitar solos ever. Echo literally had to climb a mountain to record "Broke My Neck," and it conjures images of cold midnight mingling with red amplifier lights upon their faces as they forge it. "Broke My Neck" is followed by four live songs that show just how powerful and commanding the Bunnymen's live performances had become by this point. Overall, these bonus tracks only add to an already perfect package.

1981 Korova
1. Show of Strength 4:50
2. With a Hip 3:16
3. Over the Wall 5:59
4. It Was a Pleasure 3:12
5. A Promise 4:08
6. Heaven Up Here 3:45
7. The Disease 2:28
8. All My Colours 4:06
9. No Dark Things 4:27
10. Turquoise Days 3:51
11. All I Want 4:09
2003 Reissue Bonus Tracks
12. Broke My Neck (long version) 7:22
13. Show of Strength (live) 4:41
14. The Disease (live) 1:53
15. All I Want (live) 3:09
16. Zimbo (live) 3:52

Monday, October 15, 2012

Echo and the Bunnymen -- Crocodiles

Photobucket
8/10

It's October, one of the best months to listen to Echo and the Bunnymen.
Let's get this out of the way:
I love Echo and the Bunnymen.
I feel like they are a near perfect reflection of my psyche. The vocalist/rhythm guitarist and the lead guitarist are both abstract dreamers,constantly doing strange, unorthodox things. On the other hand, the bassist and the drummer are both completely down to earth, musically, a bedrock that grounds and drives the more out there stuff the other two guys are doing. Also, they are probably the greatest rock rhythm section of all time..just like my psyche. Sorry, I didn't know where to take that. Anyway...

Echo and the Bunnymen's debut album, Crocodiles, is a lean little monster. The band is hammering out their sound, and yet it already feels immediate and fully formed, despite the fact that it is far more spare than their later work. Unlike the previous sentence, Crocodiles knows where it is going, gets there quickly, and gets out. In half an hour, there is no time to get tired of anything The Bunnymen are doing. When Crocodiles ends, the only option is starting the album over.
Genre? Who knows. Crocodiles has a definite punk attitude, but at the same time, it is something completely different. The rhythm section is really driving in this one, and the other two guys pull as much off the wall as they can as they're yanked along. Did that make any sense? Well, sorry. Crocodiles sounds like the coolest part of the 80's, a great soundtrack for Halloween, and like pretty much no one else. Of course, Echo and the Bunnymen had a pretty famous contemporary...
What U2 Were Doing At the Time: Despite the fact that he insulted them on a regular basis, Echo frontman, Ian McCulloch, used U2's artistic success as an almost reverse bellwether to his band's. In the early years, McCulloch would think of U2's more commercially popular releases as crap, while regarding his own band's work as excellent.
DISCLAIMER: THESE ARE MY TWO FAVORITE BANDS
Magically, and almost as a point of destiny, the first five albums for both bands came out in the exact same years, often months apart, which makes makes this section of the review quite easy. Shortly after the Bunnymen released Crocodiles, U2 released their debut, Boy. Like Crocodiles for the Bunnymen, Boy is more driving and spare than U2's later work. Both albums come off as unique and hungry statements of purpose. Both feature weird guitar players, loud vocalists (taking pages from Morrison and Bowie, and then throwing that out the window and doing their own thing), and firm rhythmic foundations. The difference from the beginning is that U2's debut is overwhelmingly earnest, while Echo's is effortlessly the coolest guy in the room. And yet, both albums are great debuts. Boy was actually less commercially successful in the United Kingdom than Crocodiles, though America was a different story...
2003 Edition Bonus Tracks: The early aughts re-releases for Echo and the Bunnymen's first five albums are excellent and feature a variety of bonus tracks. The Crocodiles edition features two songs that were originally only found on the American vinyl release, "Do It Clean" and "Read It in Books." They are both good songs, but the band was wise to keep the original version of Crocodiles trim without them. "Simple Stuff" is another good track recorded during the Crocodiles time-frame. After these are three early versions of Crocodiles-era tracks that are raw and fun, but not as good as the originals. The final four tracks make up the entirety of a live Bunnymen EP released after CrocodilesShine So Hard. The two cuts from Crocodiles, and two embryonic versions of tracks from the Bunnymen's second album, Heaven Up Here, are fast, raw, and furious. The band's early shows must have consisted of kids nodding their heads really, really quickly. While none of these bonus tracks are as good as what's on the original cut of the album, they are all worth having.

1980 Korova
1. Going Up 3:57
2. Stars Are Stars 2:45
3. Pride 2:41
4. Monkeys 2:49
5. Crocodiles 2:38
6. Rescue 4:26
7. Villiers Terrace 2:44
8. Pictures on My Wall 2:52
9. All That Jazz 2:43
10. Happy Death Men 4:56
2003 Edition Bonus Tracks
11. Do It Clean 2:44
12. Read It in Books 2:31
13. Simple Stuff 2:38
14. Villiers Terrace (early version) 3:08
15. Pride (early version) 2:54
16. Simple Stuff (early version) 2:37
17. Crocodiles (live) 5:09
18. Zimbo (live) 3:36
19. All That Jazz (live) 2:53
20. Over the Wall (live) 5:28

Friday, October 12, 2012

The Viking Warrior Mikkel Kessler Will Now Brand His Name In The Back Of Your Head


Drove home from New Orleans at 3 a.m. the other night. Started falling asleep. Put it on the modern rock station. This song came on. It sounds like something False River Academy would play at a pep rally. In fact, I can see the modern rock kids at that school cranking this up with their windows down and peeling out of the parking lot. Awesome.

The Music of Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future

Photobucket
9/10

Well, this is about as niche as you can get: an unreleased soundtrack from a little-played video game so difficult most never overcame its earliest levels, on a little-played system from over a decade ago. I gave serious thought to skipping this particular review, but that would be a disservice to this excellent work.
The great thing about Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future's soundtrack is that it doesn't sound like video game music (not that there is anything wrong with that). It is film quality from start to finish, something almost unheard of at the start of the previous decade. In a past tribute to the video game system the soundtrack was composed for, I described Defender of the Future's music as "a throwback to 70's New Age, Science Fiction, and Nature Documentary Soundtracks." That description was apt. To use more emotion-driven words, this soundtrack is mostly ethereal, sometimes thrilling, and always engaging on its own. The wonder is, this music wasn't originally heard on its own--it was backing up an equally ethereal, sometimes thrilling video game. Watch a second of this and see what I mean in action.

It is almost crazy that a game looked this good twelve years ago. It is crazy even now that a game sounds this good, period. If you played this track for a Battlestar Galactica fan and told them it was taken from that particular show, I don't think they would doubt you for a second.
The composer of the majority of Defender of the Future's score is Tim Follin. Follin handled a complete re-composition of the game after Attila Helger's score was rejected (a little of Helger's work remains in a few of the game's cutscenes).
Follin deserves a medal. This is incredible work. Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future is one of those games that is so hard, it can take months to beat, even with a guide. Thankfully, this beautiful music keeps the player going, even just to hear what Follin has composed for them next. It is little wonder that all these years later, a small cult is still celebrating Follin's work, continuously cleaning up and re-posting the songs for free...in fact, a new update was released just weeks ago. That's dedication, and I am immediately going to replace my lower quality soundtrack with these new files. You can check them out at Caverns of Hope, an Ecco Fansite.
You can also find them all on Youtube. That's dolphintastic. Dolphincredible? Dolphcellent? Dawesome?
I'm out.


Winston Churchill

Photobucket
He was right about everything. I guess I am coming up upon forty.

Thursday, October 11, 2012

East West -- Hope In Anguish

Photobucket
6/10

East West fans, conditioned to expect awesomeness from the band's Floodgate Records debut, were rightfully let down by its follow-up, Hope in Anguish. After a member change, the band was forced to record with only two weeks of songwriting preparation. It shows. Nothing on this album comes close to the quality of The Light In Guinevere's Garden's "She Cries." On top of that, the diversity and production values found in Guinevere's Garden are largely and strangely missing. Though East West are still on the same label as before, there are times that Hope in Anguish sounds like a recording a local band would sell you out of their trunk. I have no idea why this is the case, and if I ever meet frontman, Mike Tubbs, I am going to ask him. I'm serious.
The songwriting on Hope In Anguish isn't bad. It just sticks to one track instead of branching out like Guinevere's Garden did. That track is radio hard rock. This more monotonous style, blended with the bad production, makes Hope in Anguish a slog at times. Coupled with that, Tubbs lyrics sound weary, paranoid, and downtrodden. I lost count of how many tracks reference being trapped in a corner ("where screams die") or up against a wall with people looking in.
There's a reason I gave this a six instead of a five or a four, though. Amidst all these complaints, lies a talented act. That's the weirdest element of Hope In Anguish: despite the fact that it is not that fun to listen to, you can tell that East West are a very good band, even if you haven't heard their previous album. In fact, Hope In Anguish sounds like the album that should have come BEFORE The Light In Guinevere's Garden. My assumption is that by 2003, East West were just exhausted, and their breakup soon after Hope In Anguish's release gives my theory some credence. And if I ever meet Mike Tubbs, I'll ask him that, too...


2003 Floodgate Records
1. Vacant 3:28
2. Dwell 4:13
3. Drink Me 3:05
4. Seven 3:58
5. For Every Wish 3:25
6. Brutally Wrong 2:40
7. Murderer 2:45
8. Envy 3:41
9. The Final Say 4:33
10. Zero Hour 3:58
11. The Great Façade 4:54
12. Carpe Noctum 13:09

This Just In: New Deftones Song, "Tempest," Makes Crappy Morning Less Crappy

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

East West -- The Light In Guinevere's Garden

Photobucket
8/10

And now back to the time when Christian rock music was not only incredibly diverse, but spread out over a surprising number of quality independent record labels. One of these labels suffering from an embarrassment of musical riches was Floodgate Records. Floodgate's currency consisted of great bands like Cool Hand Luke, Denison Marrs, and East West. East West's The Light In Guinevere's Garden miraculously showcases yet another band with a firm grasp on dynamics, diversity, atmosphere, and rocking your face off.  While the main focus here is hard rock, East West strays from the path several times with stunning results. This just makes the current musical landscape more depressing. East West and countless other Christian bands from this period could find songwriting success wandering through genres unseparated by walls, while today's music scene sees everything with some sort of "core" at the end. Back in the day (NO! Must not use this expression!), East West could knock a ridiculously heavy song like "Nephesh" out of the park

and then follow it with a laid back, groovy, spacey jam like "Closure" as if there were no rules.

It helps that East West sounds like grown men who can actually play their instruments, successfully experiment with different guitar effects and tones, harmonize vocally, and use a keyboard in a way that augments a song instead of lazily carrying it. For an even greater dichotomy later on, the band contrasts their heaviest track of all, "Ded" (which has some pretty dynamic "quiet" and "loud" moments), with an absolute legendary beauty of a song, "She Cries."

If you clicked the player above, you just heard one of the greatest recordings of all time. You're welcome.
Most of the people who bought this album, myself included*, did so because they heard "She Cries" on a sampler. Some of those buyers may have been disappointed that the majority of The Light In Guinevere sounds nothing like the song they purchased the album for. I can't see how any fans of diversity, though, especially those not offended by some heaviness, will feel the same. The Light In Guinevere's Garden is yet another great chapter in the vast story of turn-of-the-century Christian rock**.

* To date this album, remember those crazy music club (mostly Columbia House) deals where if you bought three or four albums at full price, you could get unlimited more for $3 each? I used to do those all the time to build up my collection. One college afternoon, the Rabbit and I went really nuts on one, maniacally laughing as we clicked away and watched the savings pile high. After topping over $200 in money saved, we finally ran out of options, but we snagged some good ones, including this East West album. And then things got really crazy.
Photobucket

**When I say turn-of-the-century Christian Rock, I mean roughly the period between 1995-2005, with a particular concentration on '00-'03. Maybe I'll write a book about it someday.

2001 Floodgate Records
1. Wake 3:12
2. Song-X 2:41
3. Nephesh 2:55
4. Closure 3:37
5. Disturbed 4:05
6. Pictures 2:52
7. Ded 2:08
8. She Cries 5:34
9. Superstar 3:32
10. Breathe 2:47
11. Let You Go 3:59

Tuesday, October 09, 2012

So Much for D, and Also, "Why are you giving out so many high scores, reviewer dude?"

Well, that was fun. I just got to spend months reviewing albums by some of my favorite artists. In the process, I gave no less than nine tens. I made that sentence confusing on purpose. Nine tens is a lot, but here's a disclaimer: These are all my albums. Of course the scores are going to tilt high! I wouldn't have purchased them if I thought I wouldn't like them! The glory of the Internet let's us listen before we buy. I buy things blind sometimes--few things are more rewarding than picking up a mystery album and finding it is a gem--but for the most part, I am reviewing albums that I purchased knowing full well I would like them. That's why my average score is closer to a seven than a five. I'm a tough critic, I'm just reviewing from my favorite pool. There are some fish I'd like to kick out, but for the most part, I really like what I am swimming with. I don't like this analagy. I spelled 'analogy' wrong.

Photobucket

The E's should be short, but interesting. Some less known, but really awesome bands, a few more popular ones, perhaps a video game strangely tossed in, and a very in-depth look at the work of Echo and the Bunnymen, a band not hugely known, but quite important to me. Now here's Kate Middleton, stressing out about corn dogs again.


PhotobucketPhotobucket





Monday, October 08, 2012

Dear Godspeed You! Black Emperor,

Like most people at Tipitina's last night, I had waited a decade or more to witness your live show. I also drove two hours, and paid my hard earned money to see you play some songs. In two hours, you did not play much. You set drones for almost an hour of your performance. Few if any of the paid attendees to your show came to see you sitting on the floor tweaking the knobs on your amps for a full hour out of two. We came to hear the songs that have been keeping us hopeful over the last decade that you might get back together, and that we might finally get a chance to see you live. You even posted the word "Hope" continuously on the screen behind you. What you actually did was crush it. I got the worst sinking feeling during the one chord of the "middle drone" of your set that this was actually the show. What really made me sad was the thought that almost exactly a year ago, I saw Explosions in the Sky play a killer set in the same venue. Explosions in the Sky is supposed to be the derivative, pop version of you, and yet, in the decade you have been gone, they have surpassed you. Their albums have become complete originals, sounding like no one else, standalone novels made entirely of music. Their set was loud, emotional, and satisfying. That's all I wanted from you, and you didn't deliver. Why come all the way from Canada to sit on the floor and tweak buttons? I feel like you owe me another show.
In fact, until you rectify this, you have actually lowered my opinion of the entire nation of Canada. So here is a picture of Explosions in the Sky.
TEXAS FOREVER!!!
Photobucket

Friday, October 05, 2012

The Dust Brothers -- Fight Club: Original Motion Picture Score

Photobucket
10/10

Fight Club's soundtrack is the graveyard of the Twentieth Century. The ghosts of music inspired by 100 years of war, economic meltdown, more war, civil unrest, mass media, commercial jingles, and all of the freedom money can buy rest here. Through samples, instruments, and general electronic tomfoolery, The Dust Brothers, in their only full-length album, create an original soundtrack that is key to its films success.*
The definite aura of fin de siècle that surrounds Fight Club is largely contributed by the work The Dust Brothers put into scoring the film. Thankfully, on its own, Fight Club's Original Motion Picture Score works in a self-contained world of atmosphere that makes for an impeccable listen. In the last decade, I've actually come back to it more than the film. The second track, "Homework," features everything I've described.

The creepy noises that begin the song, the retro beat and guitar sound, the odd, ominous sound effects underneath, the way the fun throwback keyboard and old Mexican café horns pop up from nowhere to join the beat, and the way everything falls out to be replaced by Gregorian chants in the final minute. It's completely, excellently unpredictable. This is a world I can live in, and thanks to a barely $3 purchase after shipping on Amazon, one I often do.

*I obsessed over Fight Club after its release, but I hadn't seen it in almost a decade. I recently re-watched it with my wife of nearly six years (and friend of many more), and was shocked that she deduced the film's major twist almost an hour before it was revealed. I've never met a guy who did that, and after analyzing, I've come to a pretty disturbing conclusion that highlights the faults in the current male psyche more than any of this film's hyper-exaggerated details and dialogue: to go along with what the film is originally presenting as the plot, the viewer must except and rationalize in their mind that the main female character is simply a slut. That she would have motivations for her actions beyond simply being an object is apparently beyond male comprehension. However, my wife immediately thought, this woman must be acting odd for a reason, and after only a moment of thinking, inferred the logical and correct conclusion. I'm not sure what that says for the film, or the male sex in general.

1999 Ryko/WEA
1. Who Is Tyler Durden? 5:03
2. Homework 4:36
3. What Is Fight Club? 4:44
4. Single Serving Jack 4:14
5. Corporate World 2:42
6. Psycho Boy Jack 2:57
7. Hessel, Raymond K. 2:49
8. Medulla Oblongata 5:59
9. Jack's Smirking Revenge 3:58
10. Stealing Fat 2:21
11. Chemical Burn 3:35
12. Marla 4:22
13. Commissioner Castration 3:06
14. Space Monkeys 3:18
15. Finding the Bomb 6:50
16. This is Your Life (Featuring Tyler Durden) 3:31

Thursday, October 04, 2012

DrugMoney -- MTN CTY JNK

Photobucket
5/10

Review in fragments. DrugMoney's MTN CTY JNK not good or bad. Power pop with simple power chord changes, keyboard leads, super simple drums, and strangely, a grunge vocalist. Heard "Small Thinking" on college radio station. Really enjoyed it. Saw MTN CTY JNK used at local music store for really cheap. Picked it up. Not impressed. Barely kept my interest. Started dating new girl. Made out all the time. Forgot about MTN CTY JNK. Just put it on again. Still forgettable. "Small Thinking" still a decent song, though. MTN CTY JNK only album DrugMoney released. Maybe album cover art not greatest idea. Maybe band name not greatest idea, either.

Listen to "Small Thinking" below


2004 Hybrid Recordings
1. I Know 2:13
2. Small Thinking 3:43
3. Rough & Tumble 1:43
4. Oregon Song 2:57
5. Wish Away 1:23
6. Becoming 3:03
7. Anyway 3:08
8. Always/Never 2:57
9. Stars 2:41
10. Walk 2:22
11. D.M.D. 3:02
12. Trenton Makes 2:08
13. Runaround 2:52
14. Beautiful 3:26

Wednesday, October 03, 2012

Justin Bieber Vomits Everywhere


What's wrong with that kid?
He needs a hero.
A hero to rescue him.
And that hero is Nicholas Cage.

Births in America Are Down...AND THAT IS A GOOD THING!!!

Why do we act like this is a bad thing? Why is this reported in such a fashion? The main problem facing our entire planet today is overpopulation, and the tax on our finite resources. So why do we lament birth rates going down? Birth rates going down is exactly what we want! This is not a negative! This is ideal! It is time to start reporting this with joy!!!
If the world is going to survive, people have to have less children. This is a simple fact. Anyone who understands exponentiation should understand this. If you don't, I'll break it down for you. Two people have four kids. That equals four more people. If each of the four kids has four kids, that equals sixteen people. If each of the sixteen people has four kids, that equals 64 people. If each of the 64 people has four kids, that's 256 people! The Earth isn't growing. It is always going to be 510,072,000 square kilometers. It is always only going to be able to produce what 510,072,000 square kilometers can produce(and actually far less than that, as 71% is water). If the Earth is going to survive, there is only one solution:
LESS PEOPLE, NOT MORE!!!!!!!!!
Sorry, this really upsets me. Actually, I'm not sorry. Expect to hear me rant about this again.
Photobucket

Tuesday, October 02, 2012

Driver Eight -- Watermelon

Photobucket
8/10

Now here is an unfairly neglected album. Just one listen to Driver Eight's Watermelon will make you dream of a mid-90's summer afternoon, watching some lazily rocking music videos. In fact, here is the video for Driver Eight's "Strange."

You know what? I can't even review this. After watching this, I am getting so depressed thinking about how unfair it is that I got the 90's and kids today get the horrible, horrible, (skip below, this is about to get ridiculous), horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, horrible, so bad it is indescribable crap culture that exists today. In the 90's, independent alternative rock was an unpretentious, easily found element of the flourishing music scene. Is there music like this anywhere anymore? Not really, and there aren't music video channels, and the summer is like ten degrees hotter, and we are at war with like eighteen different countries, nobody ever actually talks to each other, and everything, everywhere, all the time suuuucks.* BRING BACK THE 90's, NOW!!!

1996 Tooth & Nail Records
1. Watermelon 3:27
2. Polish 4:10
3. Cheers 3:36
4. Strange 4:18
5. Getting This Thing to Go 3:21
6. Waiting for Godot 3:19
7. Brown Paper Bag 3:38
8. Drive 4:16
9. Sunbittern 3:33
10. Carrousel 4:48
11. Superglue 3:26

*I might have exaggerated a little bit in this sentence for nostalgia's sake. A world in which the 90's existed can't be all that bad.